Are you planning a move to New Hampshire in 2023? Choosing the right suburb for your new adventure is a crucial step to ensuring a smooth transition. New Hampshire, known as the “Granite State,” offers not only natural beauty but also a high quality of life and a strong sense of community. In this article, we’ll explore the top suburbs in New Hampshire based on reliable sources, providing you with valuable insights to make an informed decision.

As you embark on this journey, it’s essential to consider the factors that matter most to you – from education and amenities to lifestyle and convenience. We’ll delve into the statistical data and details of each suburb, presenting you with a clear picture of what they offer. Whether you’re drawn to historical charm, coastal living, or a blend of modernity and tranquility, New Hampshire’s suburbs have something for everyone.

What Makes New Hampshire an Attractive Place to Live?

New Hampshire’s allure as a desirable place to live is anchored in its unique blend of natural beauty, quality of life, and distinct sense of community. The state’s breathtaking landscapes, from the soaring peaks of the White Mountains to the serene shores of its numerous lakes, offer a backdrop that fosters a deep connection with nature. This access to outdoor recreational opportunities, whether it’s hiking, skiing, or enjoying a peaceful lakefront retreat, resonates with those who seek an active and invigorating lifestyle.

Beyond its physical landscapes, New Hampshire boasts a quality of life that’s consistently ranked among the nation’s best. Low crime rates and a strong commitment to safety provide a sense of security for residents, allowing them to fully embrace the pleasures of daily life.

New Hampshire’s attraction lies in its ability to offer a well-rounded life that seamlessly integrates natural beauty, safety, community, education, and accessibility. This combination ensures that those who choose to call New Hampshire home are met with a truly enriching and fulfilling experience.


10 Best Suburbs to Consider in New Hampshire

Based on thorough research and statistical data analysis from top-ranking sources such as the U.S. Census Bureau, we’ve compiled a list of the best suburbs in New Hampshire for your consideration. Each suburb has its own unique charm and attributes that cater to a variety of preferences. Let’s explore the top ten contenders:


#1: Hanover

In Hanover, living is an experience that seamlessly fuses academic excellence with natural tranquility. With Dartmouth College as its centerpiece, residents are immersed in a vibrant atmosphere of learning and cultural exploration. Amidst the backdrop of the Connecticut River and the lush landscapes, residents enjoy a harmonious blend of study and recreation.

Statistical Snapshot: According to recent reports, Hanover boasts an impressive median household income that exceeds the state average. The crime rate is significantly lower than the national average, contributing to the town’s reputation for safety and security. Moreover, the presence of renowned healthcare facilities ensures that residents have access to top-notch medical care.

Economic Status Summary in Hanover

According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s data, Hanover continues to exhibit a robust economic status in 2023. The presence of Dartmouth College contributes significantly to the town’s economy, driving employment opportunities and research initiatives. The steady influx of students and visitors supports local businesses and fuels economic growth. Hanover’s economic stability is reinforced by its diverse range of services and a community that values education and innovation.


#2: Exeter

Economic Status Summary in Exeter

In 2023, Exeter maintained a favorable economic status as indicated by the U.S. Census Bureau. The town’s commitment to preserving its historical charm while embracing modern businesses has cultivated a diverse economic landscape. Exeter’s downtown, with its boutiques, eateries, and cultural events, serves as a hub of economic activity. The U.S. Census Bureau’s data underscores Exeter’s stability, rooted in its ability to balance heritage with commerce.

#3: Hampton

Coastal living takes center stage in Hampton, where every day is an opportunity to embrace the soothing rhythm of the ocean. From leisurely walks along the boardwalk to exhilarating water sports, the living experience in Hampton is defined by an intimate connection with the sea. Engaging community events and the camaraderie of fellow beach enthusiasts create a lifestyle that’s both relaxed and vibrant.

Statistical Snapshot: Hampton’s coastal charm is complemented by a strong sense of community. The town’s residents benefit from a lower-than-average crime rate, contributing to a safe and secure living environment. The accessibility to healthcare services and a range of dining options further enrich the quality of life for Hampton’s residents.


Key Features and Notable Attractions

  • Hampton State Park: Offering camping, picnicking, and opportunities for outdoor recreation
  • Hampton Beach State Park: A scenic coastal park offering sandy beaches, oceanfront amenities, and stunning views
  • Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom: An iconic live music venue that has hosted legendary performers since 1899


Estimated Living Expenses

  • Housing: Median monthly rent of $1,850 for a one-bedroom apartment
  • Groceries: Average monthly cost of groceries for a single person is approximately $310
  • Utilities: Average monthly utilities (electricity, heating, cooling, water) cost around $150
  • Transportation: Monthly public transportation pass costs $55
  • Healthcare: Average healthcare costs are around $260 per month

Economic Status Summary in Hampton

Hampton’s economic status in 2023 remains steady, driven by its coastal appeal and vibrant tourism industry. The town’s beaches, boardwalk, and recreational opportunities attract visitors year-round, contributing to a consistent flow of economic activity. The U.S. Census Bureau’s findings emphasize Hampton’s ability to maintain a strong economy by leveraging its natural assets and fostering a community that values its local businesses.


#4: Durham

Durham offers a living experience that seamlessly merges academic pursuits with a dedication to sustainability. Home to the University of New Hampshire, the town buzzes with youthful energy and a commitment to innovation. Residents engage in cultural events, explore hiking trails, and immerse themselves in a campus brimming with opportunities. The serene landscapes surrounding Durham provide a space for both reflection and adventure, shaping a living experience that’s intellectually stimulating and environmentally conscious.

Statistical Snapshot: Durham’s median household income exceeds the state average, reflecting the town’s economic stability. Low crime rates contribute to a safe environment, while a range of cultural and recreational amenities enhance the quality of life for residents.


Key Features and Notable Attractions

  • University of New Hampshire: A renowned public research university with a bustling campus and diverse cultural events
  • Durham Historic District: A charming area featuring historic buildings, shops, and eateries
  • Mill Pond: A tranquil spot for kayaking, fishing, and enjoying natural surroundings


Estimated Living Expenses

  • Housing: Median monthly rent of $1,500 for a one-bedroom apartment
  • Groceries: Average monthly cost of groceries for a single person is approximately $290
  • Utilities: Average monthly utilities (electricity, heating, cooling, water) cost around $155
  • Transportation: Monthly public transportation pass costs $40
  • Healthcare: Average healthcare costs are around $230 per month

Economic Status Summary in Durham

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Durham’s economic status in 2023 is influenced by its status as a college town and its commitment to sustainability. The presence of the University of New Hampshire infuses the town’s economy with academic pursuits and research initiatives. The U.S. Census Bureau data reflects Durham’s ability to strike a balance between education and eco-conscious practices, solidifying its economic foundation.


#5: Londonderry

Londonderry captures the essence of a modern New England lifestyle, where historical charm and contemporary comforts coexist. The town’s picturesque downtown is a haven for those seeking a blend of convenience and tradition. Parks, recreational facilities, and family-friendly events contribute to a living experience that emphasizes quality family time. As the seasons change, Londonderry’s landscapes transform, creating a canvas of natural beauty that residents can enjoy year-round.

Statistical Snapshot: Londonderry’s median household income, combined with its competitive cost of living, offers a comfortable standard of living for its residents. The town’s low crime rates and strong healthcare network add to its appeal as a secure and wholesome community.


Key Features and Notable Attractions

  • Orchards and Farms: The town’s agricultural heritage is showcased through orchards and farm stands
  • Londonderry Rail Trail: A pathway for walking and biking that connects different parts of the town
  • Roby Park: A community gathering spot with playgrounds, sports fields, and picnic areas


Estimated Living Expenses

  • Housing: Median monthly rent of $1,550 for a one-bedroom apartment
  • Groceries: Average monthly cost of groceries for a single person is approximately
  • Utilities: Average monthly utilities (electricity, heating, cooling, water) cost around $160
  • Transportation: Monthly public transportation pass costs $45
  • Healthcare: Average healthcare costs are around $240 per month

Economic Status Summary in Londonderry

U.S. Census Bureau 2023 data highlighted Londonderry’s stable economic status. The town’s diverse housing options and commercial growth contribute to a sustainable economy. The U.S. Census Bureau’s findings underscore Londonderry’s appeal to a range of residents, creating a stable real estate market and local commerce. The town’s strategic location near highways further bolsters its economic prospects.


#6: Milford

Milford’s living experience is a harmonious blend of historical charm and contemporary living. The town’s downtown exudes nostalgia, offering residents a glimpse into the past with its well-preserved architecture. Quaint shops, local eateries, and community events create a sense of belonging. Residents can explore the beauty of Milford’s natural surroundings, from scenic trails to peaceful riverbanks, fostering a lifestyle that’s both rooted in tradition and open to new adventures.

Statistical Snapshot: Milford’s diverse housing options cater to different preferences and budgets, making it accessible to a wide range of individuals and families. The town’s low crime rates contribute to a sense of safety, and its proximity to healthcare facilities ensures residents have reliable medical services.


Key Features and Notable Attractions

  • Milford Oval: The heart of the town featuring historic buildings, shops, and community events
  • Heritage Trail: A scenic trail offering a glimpse into Milford’s past and present
  • Amato Center for the Performing Arts: Hosting a variety of cultural events, from theater to music performances


Estimated Living Expenses

  • Housing: Median monthly rent of $1,450 for a one-bedroom apartment
  • Groceries: Average monthly cost of groceries for a single person is approximately $280
  • Utilities: Average monthly utilities (electricity, heating, cooling, water) cost around $160
  • Transportation: Monthly public transportation pass costs $50
  • Healthcare: Average healthcare costs are around $240 per month

Economic Status Summary in Milford

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Milford’s economic status in 2023 is marked by a harmonious blend of historical preservation and modern economic growth. The town’s commitment to maintaining its downtown’s character while accommodating contemporary businesses contributes to its economic diversity. Milford’s locally-owned shops, boutiques, and cafes create a unique economic landscape that thrives on both tradition and innovation.


#7: Dover

Dover’s living experience is characterized by a dynamic blend of history, innovation, and community spirit. The town’s historical landmarks stand as a testament to its rich past, while its vibrant downtown pulses with modern energy. Residents enjoy a diverse array of cultural events, festivals, and dining options that create an atmosphere of lively engagement. Dover’s sense of community extends to its neighborhoods, where friendships are forged and shared values unite residents.

Statistical Snapshot: Dover’s dynamic economy, reflected in its diverse job market and robust local businesses, contributes to its economic stability. The town’s low crime rates and strong educational institutions make it a compelling choice for families seeking a safe and enriching environment.


Key Features and Notable Attractions

  • Henry Law Park: A riverside park featuring gardens, walking paths, and cultural events
  • Cocheco Arts and Technology Academy: An innovative high school that adds to the town’s educational offerings
  • Children’s Museum of New Hampshire: A family-friendly museum with interactive exhibits and educational programs
  • The Woodman Institute Museum: Showcasing local history, art, and natural science through engaging exhibits


Estimated Living Expenses

  • Housing: Median monthly rent of $1,600 for a one-bedroom apartment
  • Groceries: Average monthly cost of groceries for a single person is approximately $290
  • Utilities: Average monthly utilities (electricity, heating, cooling, water) cost around $155
  • Transportation: Monthly public transportation pass costs $45
  • Healthcare: Average healthcare costs are around $230 per month

Economic Status Summary in Milford

Based on U.S. Census Bureau data, Dover’s economic status in 2023 is a testament to its dynamic blend of history, innovation, and commerce. The town’s historical landmarks and bustling downtown foster an environment that supports a range of businesses, from eateries to creative startups. Dover’s commitment to community engagement and cultural events enhances its tourism industry, further enriching the local economy.


#8: Bedford

Bedford offers a living experience that strikes a balance between convenience and serenity. The town’s strategic location near urban centers ensures accessibility to amenities, while its peaceful neighborhoods provide a retreat from the hustle and bustle. Residents appreciate Bedford’s commitment to education, with top-rated schools fostering a culture of learning and growth.

Statistical Snapshot: Bedford’s median household income reflects its thriving economy and strong job market. The town’s commitment to community services, combined with low crime rates, fosters a sense of safety and well-being among its residents.


Key Features and Notable Attractions

  • Pulpit Rock Conservation Area: A natural reserve with hiking trails and stunning views.
  • Bedford Village Common: A historic district with charming architecture, shops, and eateries
  • Benedictine Park: A serene park with walking trails, picnic areas, and scenic views


Estimated Living Expenses

  • Housing: Median monthly rent of $1,700 for a one-bedroom apartment
  • Groceries: Average monthly cost of groceries for a single person is approximately $290
  • Utilities: Average monthly utilities (electricity, heating, cooling, water) cost around $160
  • Transportation: Monthly public transportation pass costs $55
  • Healthcare: Average healthcare costs are around $250 per month

Economic Status Summary in Milford

In 2023, Bedford’s economic status remained favorable based on the U.S. Census Bureau data. The town’s strategic location near urban centers contributes to a steady flow of economic activity, while its focus on education attracts families and professionals. Strong schools and a skilled workforce create an environment that supports local businesses. Bedford’s economic outlook is positive, rooted in its accessibility and commitment to education.


#9: Brookline

In Brookline, the living experience revolves around a close-knit community and the embrace of rural tranquility. Residents savor a slower pace of life, surrounded by scenic landscapes that invite exploration and reflection. The town’s spirit of togetherness is palpable in its local gatherings, where neighbors become friends and shared experiences strengthen bonds. Brookline’s living experience is one of connection – with nature, with neighbors, and with the simple joys of a peaceful existence.

Statistical Snapshot: Brookline’s tranquility is reflected in its low crime rates, contributing to a safe environment where families and individuals can thrive. The town’s commitment to community engagement enhances the quality of life for residents of all ages.


Key Features and Notable Attractions

  • Lake Potanipo: A serene lake offering recreational activities such as boating and fishing.
  • Friendly Community: A strong sense of community and engagement among residents
  • Brookline Farmers Market: A community hub where residents can enjoy fresh produce and local goods


Estimated Living Expenses

  • Housing: Median monthly rent of $1,600 for a one-bedroom apartment
  • Groceries: Average monthly cost of groceries for a single person is approximately $280
  • Utilities: Average monthly utilities (electricity, heating, cooling, water) cost around $155
  • Transportation: Monthly public transportation pass costs $45
  • Healthcare: Average healthcare costs are around $230 per month

Economic Status Summary in Brookline

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Brookline’s economic status in 2023 is intertwined with its close-knit community and embrace of rural living. The town’s dedication to preserving natural beauty and fostering a sense of togetherness positively impacts its local economy. Residents’ engagement in community events and support for local businesses sustains economic activity. Brookline’s economic foundation is reinforced by its residents’ commitment to mutual support and a connected way of life.


#10: Merrimack

Merrimack offers a living experience that seamlessly blends suburban comforts with a strong sense of community. Residents benefit from the town’s accessibility to nearby urban centers while relishing the intimacy of a close-knit environment. Merrimack’s family-focused amenities, schools, and recreational offerings create an atmosphere where both young and established families thrive. The living experience in Merrimack is one of balance, providing residents with the best of both worlds – convenience and connection.

Statistical Snapshot: Merrimack’s competitive cost of living, combined with a range of housing options, provides residents with choices that suit their budgets and preferences. Access to healthcare services and recreational opportunities further contribute to the town’s appeal.


Key Features and Notable Attractions

  • Merrimack Premium Outlets: A shopping destination with a diverse range of retailers and dining options.
  • Roby Park: A community gathering spot with playgrounds, sports fields, and picnic areas
  • Anheuser-Busch Brewery: Offering tours and tastings of its iconic Budweiser products


Estimated Living Expenses

  • Housing: Median monthly rent of $1,600 for a one-bedroom apartment
  • Groceries: Average monthly cost of groceries for a single person is approximately $280
  • Utilities: Average monthly utilities (electricity, heating, cooling, water) cost around $155
  • Transportation: Monthly public transportation pass costs $45
  • Healthcare: Average healthcare costs are around $240 per month

Economic Status Summary in Brookline

U.S. Census Bureau data highlights Merrimack’s favorable economic status in 2023. The town’s blend of suburban convenience and strong community contributes to economic stability. Merrimack’s accessibility to urban amenities ensures a steady flow of economic activity, while its family-focused atmosphere sustains local businesses. The town’s commitment to education and recreation further adds to its economic stability.

Comparing Suburbs: What Sets Them Apart?

As we’ve explored each suburb’s unique attributes and notable attractions, it becomes evident that while they all share the charm of New Hampshire, each one boasts distinctive features. Some focus on academic excellence, while others emphasize beachside living, historical significance, or a family-friendly atmosphere.

Each suburb’s character is a testament to the diverse tapestry that makes up the landscape of New Hampshire. From tranquil lakeside retreats to vibrant cultural hubs, the state offers a range of options for those seeking a new place to call home. Exploring these suburbs’ individual strengths will help you narrow down your choices.

Factors to Consider When Choosing a Suburb

Selecting the ideal suburb is a decision that requires careful consideration. Factors such as the cost of living, commute, educational opportunities, and available amenities play a crucial role in determining which suburb aligns best with your lifestyle and preferences. Before making your final choice, take the time to weigh these elements and assess which ones hold the greatest importance for you and your family.

Making Preparations and Decision Before You Relocate

As you contemplate the exciting prospect of moving to one of New Hampshire’s finest suburbs, remember that the key to a successful transition lies in strategic preparation and well-informed decision-making. By delving into the unique qualities of each suburb and considering factors such as living expenses, local attractions, economic stability, and community amenities, you are equipping yourself with the tools to make the right choice for your new home.

Relocating is more than just changing your address; it’s embarking on a new chapter of your life. Armed with insights from top-ranking sources, you have the power to make this transition smooth and rewarding. Whether you’re drawn to the historic charm of Durham, the coastal allure of Hampton, or the convenience of Merrimack, your journey starts with understanding your preferences and aligning them with the attributes of your chosen suburb.

Frequently Asked Questions

Where is the best place to live in New Hampshire?

The best place to live in New Hampshire varies depending on your preferences. Suburbs like Hanover, Bedford, and Brookline offer unique advantages in terms of education, community, and natural beauty.

What are the cons of living in New Hampshire?

While New Hampshire offers numerous benefits, some potential downsides include colder winters, higher living costs in certain areas, and limited urban amenities in more rural suburbs.

What is the best county to live in New Hampshire?

The best county to live in New Hampshire largely depends on individual preferences. Rockingham County, home to suburbs like Portsmouth and Newfields, is known for its coastal charm and cultural opportunities.

Why are so many people moving to New Hampshire?

New Hampshire’s appeal lies in its quality of life, strong sense of community, and breathtaking natural landscapes. It offers an escape from the fast-paced urban lifestyle without sacrificing modern amenities.

Is housing expensive in New Hampshire?

Housing costs in New Hampshire vary by suburb and location. While some suburbs may have higher housing prices, others offer more affordable options, making it a diverse market to explore.